How to Deal With Allergies During Your Favorite Outdoor Adventures

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Allergy season is friend to no one who is allergic. Don’t let that ruin one of the most beautiful seasons of the year. You just need to take some measures to enjoy the outdoors.

Outdoor Adventures You Can Enjoy

If spring is an offseason for you because of allergies, it no longer has to be. You can still enjoy being outside without having to suffer through every one of your favorite outdoor activities.

Adventure #1: Hiking

Going for a hike in the springtime is one of the most popular activities among outdoor lovers, but if you’re allergic, hiking might serve as a trigger. The pollen from the grass, weeds, trees, and everything around might affect you, so make sure you check on the pollen count before you decide to head outside. Whenever the pollen count is high, it might not be the best day for a hike.

Preventing allergies outdoorsAdventure #2: Sporting Events

Games have a set date, so it’s not like you can move it to another day when the pollen count is high. If you must attend a sporting event during peak allergy season, don’t forget to take your over-the-counter or prescription meds before leaving and have some nasal spray handy, in case your allergies kick up while you’re out.

Adventure #3: Horseback Riding

Stables are one full of allergens, like hay, pollen, and even horse dander. If you’re planning to go horseback riding, take an antihistamine about two hours before you head out, one that won’t make you feel drowsy, of course. If you have prescription nasal spray, plan to start using it a few weeks prior to the event, to allow it to take effect. Once you’re with the horses, try to avoid touching them and then touching your face.

Preventing allergies while gardeningAdventure #4: Gardening

It’s hard to enjoy gardening without sneezing. All those beautiful plants you love are filled with pollen. Gardens are basically allergy headquarters. To minimize allergens in your garden, you can choose to have plants that don’t rely on wind pollination, but insect pollination instead. These are more allergy-friendly plants like cactus, geranium, sunflowers, pansies, and trees like cherry, and pear. Always use gloves, glasses and all the basic gardening gear which will minimize contact with pollen. Other than taking your meds as needed, make sure you take off all your gardening clothes and wash them, and then take a shower to get rid of any remainings of allergens that could affect you.

Spring doesn’t have to be a stay-at-home season. A little extra care might be needed, but you can still enjoy all your favorite outdoor activities.

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